Effect of bake-out on reducing VOC emissions and concentrations in a residential housing unit with a radiant floor heating system

Dong Hwa Kang, Dong Hee Choi, Seung Min Lee, Myoung Souk Yeo, Kwang Woo Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study analyzed the effect of bake-out on reducing VOC emissions and indoor concentrations in a residential housing unit with a radiant floor heating system. The effect of an elevated temperature on VOC emissions from a wallpaper assembly, plywood flooring assembly, and particle board (as an example of furniture material) was investigated in a small-scale chamber. Simultaneously, in the residential housing unit, we measured the VOC emissions from the materials and indoor concentrations in the housing unit that have previously undergone a bake-out procedure. The results from the small-scale chamber showed that VOC emissions from the investigated materials were clearly reduced by the elevated temperature. Other results from the residential housing unit showed that there were differences in the time for each material to reach the desired surface temperature, which resulted in different reduction ratio of VOC emissions and concentrations. The floor temperature increases the fastest. However, the furniture reached the desired temperature only after four days due to the large thermal mass of the particle board, which resulted in a relatively small reduction in the emissions. Our results indicate that bake-out period should be controlled for it to be effective in residential housing units that feature radiant flooring heating systems and a significant collection of furniture.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1816-1825
Number of pages10
JournalBuilding and Environment
Volume45
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

Keywords

  • Bake-out
  • Building material
  • Radiant floor heating
  • Residential housing unit
  • VOCs

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