Investigating the Spatiotemporal Imbalance of Accessibility to Demand Responsive Transit (DRT) Service for People with Disabilities: Explanatory Case Study in South Korea

Jong Hun Son, Do Gyeong Kim, Eunkyeong Lee, Hosik Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study analyzed the operation-related historical data of the call taxi service for disabled people in Seoul, South Korea. The study investigated how unevenly distributed the accessibility of disabled people to transportation is in terms of time and space. In addition, the reasons that cause imbalanced accessibility were investigated in areas with good and poor accessibility. Accessibility was defined as how quickly call taxi services for the disabled are available at specific times and locations. For the analysis, the log data for tracking the status of taxis in time and space were processed to calculate their availability, an index that reflects the dwelling time and the number of taxis available at a specific time and in a specific area. This index was divided into time and space and used as a surrogate measure to assess accessibility. The results showed that there were spatial and temporal accessibility imbalances in demand responsive transit (DRT) service. The insufficient supply during the night resulting from the current DRT operating schedule has reduced the accessibility of call taxis for the disabled, and the concentration of drivers' breaks also affected the accessibility of service during the daytime. This suggests the need for (1) an increase in supply and (2) evenly distributed breaks for the drivers. In terms of space, the outer areas of Seoul generally were found to be more accessible than the central areas. In addition, areas near depots that serve as hubs and resting places for taxi drivers, areas with excellent medical infrastructures for people with disabilities, and areas with good traffic environments tended to have good accessibility; this suggests the need to reallocate garages and improve the traffic environments to improve accessibility.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6806947
JournalJournal of Advanced Transportation
Volume2022
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

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