Methanol absorption characteristics for the removal of H2S (hydrogen sulfide), COS (carbonyl sulfide) and CO2 (carbon dioxide) in a pilot-scale biomass-to-liquid process

Myung Won Seo, Young Min Yun, Won Chul Cho, Ho Won Ra, Sang Jun Yoon, Jae Goo Lee, Yong Ku Kim, Jae Ho Kim, See Hoon Lee, Won Hyun Eom, Uen Do Lee, Sang Bong Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

The BTL (biomass-to-liquid) process is an attractive process that produces liquid biofuels from biomass. The FT (Fisher-Tropsch) process is used to produce synfuels such as diesel and gasoline from gasified biomass. However, the H2S (hydrogen sulfide), COS (carbonyl sulfide) and CO2 (carbon dioxide) in the syngas that are produced from the biomass gasifiers cause a decrease of the conversion efficiency and deactivates the catalyst that is used in the FT process. To remove the acid gases, a pilot-scale methanol absorption tower producing diesel at a rate of 1BPD (barrel per day) was developed, and the removal characteristics of the acid gases were determined. A total operation time of 500h was achieved after several campaigns. The average syngas flow rate at the inlet of methanol absorption tower ranged from 300 to 800L/min. The methanol absorption tower efficiently removed H2S from 30ppmV to less than 1ppmV and COS from 2ppmV to less than 1ppmV with a removal of CO2 from 20% to 5%. The outlet gas composition adhered to the guidelines for FT reactors. No remaining sulfurous components were found, and the tar component was analyzed in the spent methanol after long-term operations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-62
Number of pages7
JournalEnergy
Volume66
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2014

Keywords

  • Biomass-to-liquid (BTL)
  • COS
  • Fisher-Tropsch (FT) process
  • Methanol absorption tower

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