Moderate intensity walking exercises reduce the body mass index and vascular inflammatory factors in postmenopausal women with obesity: a randomized controlled trial

Woo Hyeon Son, Hyun Tae Park, Byeong Hwan Jeon, Min Seong Ha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Postmenopause, the secretion of female hormones changes, causing excessive fat accumulation in the body and leading to chronic inflammation, which increases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Walking is an easily accessible daily exercise and effective non-pharmacological treatment for reducing obesity and the incidence of CVD. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of moderate intensity walking exercises on body composition, vascular inflammatory factors, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in postmenopausal women with obesity. Twenty-six older postmenopausal women with obesity (ages 68–72) were randomly assigned to control (n = 12, BMI 26.06 ± 1.37) or exercise (n = 14, BMI 26.04 ± 1.94) groups. Following a 12-week moderate intensity walking exercise program, we measured the participants’ body composition with an InBody S10 analyzer and assessed blood sera using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. There was a significant clustering by weight (p < 0.01), body mass index (p < 0.01), percentage body fat (p < 0.001), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (p < 0.05), interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (p < 0.05) being significantly decreased in the exercise group. Although VEGF levels did not change significantly, a tendency to increase was observed in participants that exercised. Our results indicate that walking exercise may help prevent CVD in postmenopausal women with obesity by reducing obesity and vascular inflammatory factors.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20172
JournalScientific Reports
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023

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