Non-lithographic direct patterning of carbon nanomaterial electrodes via electrohydrodynamic-printed wettability patterns by polymer brush for fabrication of organic field-effect transistor

Hyeok jin Kwon, Xinlin Li, Jisu Hong, Chan Eon Park, Yong Jin Jeong, Hong Chul Moon, Se Hyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study, we report a new approach for patterning of carbon nanomaterials via the solution route through wettability patterning using electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing. Differences in wettability were successfully obtained by treating dimethylchlorosilane-terminated polystyrene (PS-brush) with the micro-dripping mode of EHD printing up to 6-μm line width and scaled fine patterns with various shapes at 6-μm printing conditions. We obtained sub-micrometer scaled carbon nanomaterial patterns, which were utilized as source and drain (S/D) electrodes for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), without using any lithographic process. In addition, the PS-brush treatment modified the surface hydrophobicity of the substrates that served as the PS-brush and SiO2 bilayer dielectrics to guarantee high stability during the OFET operation. As a result, the OFETs employing S/D electrodes based on carbon nanomaterial patterns exhibited the electrical performance of typical p-type OFETs with negligible hysteresis. Additionally, we confirmed that a solution processing organic semiconductor forms a more suitable crystal structure than a vacuum process based organic semiconductor by several tools like CPOM, AFM, and 2D-GIXD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number145989
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume515
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Jun 2020

Keywords

  • Carbon nanomaterials
  • Dimethylchlorosilane-terminated polystyrene
  • Electrodynamic jet printing
  • Non-lithographic direct patterning
  • Organic field-effect transistors
  • Wettability patterning

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