Ozone response of leaf physiological and stomatal characteristics in Brassica Juncea L. at supraoptimal temperatures

Jong Kyu Lee, Myeong Ja Kwak, Sang Hee Park, Han Dong Han Dong Kim, Yea Ji Lim, Su Gyeong Jeong, Yun Soo Choi, Su Young Woo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Plants are affected by the features of their surrounding environment, such as climate change and air pollution caused by anthropogenic activities. In particular, agricultural production is highly sensitive to environmental characteristics. Since no environmental factor is independent, the interactive effects of these factors on plants are essential for agricultural production. In this context, the interactive effects of ozone (O3) and supraoptimal temperatures remain unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological and stomatal characteristics of leaf mustard (Brassica juncea L.) in the presence of charcoal-filtered (target concentration, 10 ppb) and elevated (target concentration, 120 ppb) O3 concentrations and/or optimal (22/20 °C day/night) and supraoptimal temperatures (27/25 °C). Regarding physiological characteristics, the maximum rate of electron transport and triose phosphate use significantly decreased in the presence of elevated O3 at a supraoptimal temperature (OT conditions) compared with those in the presence of elevated O3 at an optimal temperature (O conditions). Total chlorophyll content was also significantly affected by supraoptimal temperature and elevated O3. The chlorophyll a/b ratio significantly reduced under OT conditions compared to C condition at 7 days after the beginning of exposure (DAE). Regarding stomatal characteristics, there was no significant difference in stomatal pore area between O and OT conditions, but stomatal density under OT conditions was significantly increased compared with that under O conditions. At 14 DAE, the levels of superoxide (O2 -), which is a reactive oxygen species, were significantly increased under OT conditions compared with those under O conditions. Furthermore, leaf weight was significantly reduced under OT conditions compared with that under O conditions. Collectively, these results indicate that temperature is a key driver of the O3 response of B. juncea via changes in leaf physiological and stomatal characteristics.

Original languageEnglish
Article number357
JournalLand
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Brassica Juncea L.
  • Ozone
  • Physiological characteristics
  • Stomatal characteristics
  • Supraoptimal temperature

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