Syntrophic bacteria- and Methanosarcina-rich acclimatized microbiota with better carbohydrate metabolism enhances biomethanation of fractionated lignocellulosic biocomponents

Bikram Basak, Swapnil M. Patil, Ramesh Kumar, Yongtae Ahn, Geon Soo Ha, Young Kwon Park, Moonis Ali Khan, Woo Jin Chung, Soon Woong Chang, Byong Hun Jeon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

An inadequate lignocellulolytic capacity of a conventional anaerobic digester sludge (ADS) microbiota is the bottleneck for the maximal utilization of lignocellulose in anaerobic digestion. A well-constructed microbial consortium acclimatized to lignocellulose outperformed the ADS in terms of biogas productivity when fractionated biocomponents of rice straw were used to achieve a high methane bioconversion rate. A 33.3 % higher methane yield was obtained with the acclimatized consortium (AC) compared to that of ADS control. The dominant pair-wise link between Firmicutes (18.99–40.03 %), Bacteroidota (10.94–28.75 %), and archaeal Halobacteriota (3.59–20.57 %) phyla in the AC seed digesters indicated that the keystone members of these phyla were responsible for higher methane yield. A high abundance of syntrophic bacteria such as Proteiniphilum (1.22–5.19 %), Fermentimonas (0.71–5.31 %), Syntrophomonas (0.87–3.59 %), and their syntrophic partner Methanosarcina (4.26–18.80 %) maintained the digester stability and facilitated higher substrate-to-methane conversion in the AC seed digesters. The present combined strategy will help in boosting the ‘biomass-to-methane” conversion.

Original languageEnglish
Article number127602
JournalBioresource Technology
Volume360
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2022

Keywords

  • Acclimatization
  • Acetoclastic methanogenesis
  • Anaerobic digestion
  • Biomass fractionation
  • Lignocellulosic biomass
  • Microbial community dynamics

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