The impact of a randomized dietary and physical activity intervention on chronic inflammation among obese African-American women

Oluwole Adeyemi Babatunde, Swann Arp Adams, Samantha Truman, Erica Sercy, Angela E. Murphy, Samira Khan, Thomas G. Hurley, Michael D. Wirth, Seul Ki Choi, Hiluv Johnson, James R. Hebert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lifestyle interventions may reduce inflammation and lower breast cancer (BrCa) risk. This randomized trial assessed the impact of the Sistas Inspiring Sistas Through Activity and Support (SISTAS) study on plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII). This unblinded, dietary and physical activity trial was implemented in 337 obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥30 kg/m2) African American (AA) women recruited between 2011 and 2015 in South Carolina through a community-based participatory approach with measurements at baseline, 3 months, and 12 months. Participants were randomized into either intervention (n = 176) or wait-list control group (n = 161). Linear mixed-effect models were used for analyses of CRP and IL-6. Baseline CRP was significantly higher in those with greater obesity, body fat percentage, and waist circumference (all p <.01). No difference was observed between groups for CRP or IL-6 at 3 or 12 months; however, improvements in diet were observed in the intervention group compared to the control group (p = .02) at 3 months but were not sustained at 12 months. Although the intervention was not successful at reducing levels of CRP or IL-6, a significant decrease was observed in DII score for the intervention group, indicating short-term positive dietary change.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)792-805
Number of pages14
JournalWomen and Health
Volume60
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 8 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • breast cancer
  • c-reactive protein
  • dietary Inflammatory Index
  • inflammation

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